Course Descriptions

SEMESTER I

Introduction to Radiography – RAD 111 (21 lecture hours, 1.0 credit)

This course is an introduction to the Radiography Program, the field of radiology and the organization.  Topics for discussion will include program policies and procedures; general radiology history; professional organizations; accreditation, licensure, and professional pathways. Fundamentals of radiation protection for the patient, general public, and radiographer/student with emphasis on minimizing radiation exposure and methods to accomplish ALARA concepts will be discussed. Fundamentals of radiobiology including somatic and genetic effects and units of radiation measurement will be discussed. Basic presentation of exposure factors and their application to the clinical setting is included. More complete courses on radiation protection and exposure factors will be presented in the senior year. Prerequisites: admission to the radiography program. Parallel: RAD 112, 113, 114, 115, 119. Open only to radiography students.

 

Medical Terminology I – RAD 112 (7 lecture hours, 0.5 credit)

This course is an introduction to the origin and derivation of medical terms and abbreviations, as well as their meaning.  An exploration of prefixes, suffixes and root word combinations to create specific medical terms is included. Medical terminology specific to the musculoskeletal and respiratory system will be included. This course is largely self-guided with instructor direction. Prerequisites: admission to the radiography program. Parallel: RAD 111, 113, 114, 115, 119. Open only to radiography students.

 

Radiographic Anatomy and Physiology I – RAD 113 (30 lecture hours, 2.0 credits)

This course is designed to study the human structure and its functions.  Specific emphasis will be placed on structure and function of cells, tissues, and systems to include respiratory, general abdomen, basic digestive anatomy, and the appendicular skeleton including the upper extremities, shoulder, lower extremities, and bony pelvis. Prerequisites: admission to the radiography program. Parallel: RAD 111, 112, 114, 115, 119. Open only to radiography students.

 

Radiographic Positioning I – RAD 114 (25 lecture hours, 28 lab hours, 2.5 credits)

The principles of this class are to obtain basic knowledge, skills, and application of alignment of body parts, cassettes, and x-ray tube in each elementary radiographic examination correlated with patient care procedures.  Emphasis will be placed on positioning terms, projections of the chest, abdomen, upper extremities, shoulder, lower extremities, and pelvis as well as corresponding radiographic analysis. A laboratory component is included. Prerequisites: admission to the radiography program. Parallel: RAD 111, 112, 113, 115, 119. Open only to radiography students.

 

Patient Care – RAD 115 (12 lecture, 3 lab hours, 1.0 credits)

This course provides the student with the basic concepts of patient care including consideration for the physical and psychological needs of the patient. Some topics to be covered include: Safety and transport of a patient, infection control, handling acute situations, pharmacology, emergency recognition and response, and vital signs. Prerequisites: admission to the radiography program. Parallel: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 119. Open only to radiography students.

 

Clinical Education I – RAD 119 (424 clinical hours, 9.0 credits)

Clinical Education I is the first in a series of five courses that provide the student with the necessary clinical education needed in the actual practice of radiography.  This course takes place in the clinical area.  The student is exposed to actual patient contact.  The student will begin to rotate through clinical areas of general radiology and will begin to master the basic skills necessary to function in a radiography room.  Student rotations through support areas of radiology including transport and clerical/office are included but limited.  The student will also begin to learn to master basic radiographic examinations under the direct supervision of a technologist. Students will be assigned clinically to approximately 24 contact hours / week Students will perform competency exams as identified by the syllabus. Prerequisites: admission to the radiography program. Parallel: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115. Open only to radiography students.

 

 

SEMESTER II

 

Medical Terminology II – RAD 121 (10 lecture hours, 0.5 credit)

A continuation of Medical Terminology I. Medical terminology specific to the gastrointestinal, urinary, reproductive, cardiovascular, integumentary, endocrine, nervous and sensory systems is presented. This course is largely self-guided with instructor direction. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119. Parallel: RAD 122, 123, 129. Open only to radiography students.

 

Radiographic Anatomy and Physiology II – RAD 122 (56 lecture hours, 3.5 credits)

This course is a continuation of Radiographic Anatomy and Physiology I and is designed to study the human structure and its functions. Structures and functions to be discussed include the axial skeletal system including the vertebral column, bony thorax, cranial and facial bones, digestive, urinary, biliary, reproductive, endocrine, muscular, integumentary, central nervous, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Sectional anatomy of the head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis will be presented with CT and or MRI image correlation to line diagrams. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119. Parallel: RAD 121, 123, 129. Open only to radiography students.

 

Radiographic Positioning II – RAD 123 (38 lecture hours, 23 lab hours, 3.0 credits)

This course is a continuation of Radiographic Positioning I and emphasizes the application of skills learned in RAD 104 to new clinical procedures including the vertebral column, bony thorax, cranial exams, and an in depth presentation of contrast media procedures with focus on the digestive, urinary, and biliary systems. In depth analysis of contrast media pharmacology including uses, contraindications and adverse reactions is included. Venipuncture administration is likewise discussed. Emphasis will be place on radiographic analysis and corrective measures for sub-optimal quality. Additionally, a basic presentation of procedures of the reproductive system, arthrography, and myelography will be presented. An overview of imaging during trauma and surgery is discussed. Age specific considerations including the technical adaptation for and behavioral considerations of patients across a wide spectrum of age will be emphasized. A laboratory component is included. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119. Parallel: RAD 121, 122, 129. Open only to radiography students.

 

 

Clinical Education II – RAD 129 (456 clinical hours, 10.0 credits)

This course is a continuation of Clinical Education I as students continue to rotate through various aspects of the radiology department to involve clinical participation under direct and indirect supervision of procedure taught in Radiographic Positioning I and II and to master basic patient care. Students will be assigned clinically to approximately 24 contact hours / week. Students will perform competency exams as required by syllabus. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119. Parallel: RAD 121, 122, 123. Open only to radiography students.

SEMESTER III
Radiographic Pathology – RAD 131 (12 lecture hours, 0.5 credit) 

 

This course includes the nature and causes of disease, injury and illness, especially as it applies to radiology.  This course is intended to provide the student a focus on pathology that can affect the technical factors used to obtain a radiographic image.  The course correlates various anatomic systems of the body with pathologies found in those systems.  Terminology and technical characteristics will be of major emphasis. Systems will include osseous, respiratory, digestive, cardiovascular, and nervous.  Non-systemic neoplasia pathologies and general terms will also be discussed. Basic epidemiology will be presented. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129. Parallel: RAD 139. Open only to radiography students.

 

 

Clinical Education III – RAD 139 (240 clinical hours, 5.0 credits)

This course is a continuation of Clinical Education II and serves as an intensive focus on the advancement of clinical skills acquired in Clinical Education I and II. Students will continue to rotate through various aspects of the radiology department to involve clinical participation under direct and indirect supervision of procedures taught in Radiographic Positioning I and II. Supplemental outside rotations at secondary clinical education sites within the St. Vincent Health system and primary care/ambulatory clinics to promote a wider range of experiences with equipment, protocols, and patient care may be utilized. Students will begin pediatric rotations to advance age specific consideration skills. Students will be assigned clinically to approximately 36 contact hours / week. Students will perform competency exams as required by syllabus. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129. Parallel: RAD 131. Open only to radiography students.

 

 

SEMESTER IV

 

 

Radiographic Principles I – RAD 211 (53 lecture hours, 6 lab hours, 3.5 credits)

Basic fundamentals concerned with the production, analysis, and recording of radiographic images are included in this course.  Understanding density, contrast, detail and distortion as well as their interrelationships will be emphasized.  Subject matter will include mAs, kVp, distance relationships, geometric image formation, grids, beam limiting devices, filtration, computers, digital image acquisition and processing, and technique charts. A laboratory component is included. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139. Parallel: RAD 212, 213, 214, 219. Open only to radiography students.

 

Fundamentals of Radiation Production – RAD 212 (22 lecture hours, 1.5 credits)

This course is an overview of how x-rays are produced and their interactions in human tissue. To provide a foundation for understanding the production of x-rays, the fundamentals of units of measurements and mathematics, atomic structure and nomenclature, electrodynamics and x-ray circuits, x-ray tubes, and characteristics of x-rays will be discussed. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139. Parallel: RAD 211, 213, 214, 219. Open only to radiography students.

 

Medical Ethics and Law – RAD 213 (8 lecture hours, 1.0 credit)

This course is a basic presentation of standards of ethical conduct and behavior relevant to the medical field in general and radiology in specific. Ethical principles and doctrines are reviewed. Discussion of professional responsibility to patient and the profession in terms of Patient Bill of Rights, Code of Ethics, Scope of Practice, and Standard of Care. The basics of legal aspects of medicine will also be discussed.  Various situations pertaining to moral, legal and professional conduct will comprise the core material.  Among the legal topics to be discussed will be medico-legal consideration, confidentiality, liability, and informed consent. This course will culminate with an in-depth exploration of a medico-ethical dilemma resulting in an oral debate and written thesis. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139. Parallel: RAD 211, 212, 214, 219. Open only to radiography students.

 

Fundamentals of Computed Tomography – RAD 214 (8 lecture hours, 0.5 credit)

This course presents the student with information necessary to achieve clinical competency in routine CT exams of the head / brain, thorax and abdomen / pelvis. Information covered includes basic operating principles of CT, patient care of the CT patient, radiation safety in CT, and procedural aspects of the head / brain (with and without contrast media), thorax and abdomen / pelvis (with and without contrast media). Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139. Parallel: RAD 211, 212, 213, 219. Open only to radiography students.

 

Clinical Education IV – RAD 219 (440 clinical hours, 9.5 credits)

This course is a continuation of Clinical Education III as students continue to rotate through various aspects of the radiology department to involve clinical participation under direct and indirect supervision of procedures taught in Radiographic Positioning I and II and to continue the advancement basic patient care skills. Supplemental outside rotations at secondary clinical education sites within the St. Vincent Health system and primary care/ambulatory clinics to promote a wider range of experiences with equipment, protocols, and patient care may be utilized. Students will continue pediatric rotations and will begin evening assignments as an introduction to radiography services performed after normal working hours. Students will begin dedicated CT rotations to foster clinical competency in required CT exams. Students will also begin rotations through medical imaging modalities of MRI, angiography, sonography, radiation oncology, and nuclear medicine to gain comprehensive understanding of medical imaging. Students will be assigned clinically to approximately 24 contact hours / week. Students will perform competency exams as required by syllabus. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139. Parallel: RAD 211, 212, 213, 214. Open only to radiography students.

 

 

SEMESTER V

 

Radiographic Principles II – RAD 221 (38 lecture hours, 2.5 credits)

This course provides the student with a thorough understanding of specific radiographic imaging equipment used in general radiology and the evaluation of these systems through systematic quality control testing.  Also included is a thorough exploration of film processing and conditions. Topics of discussion will include tomography, image intensifiers and fluoroscopic equipment, mobile radiographic equipment, automatic exposure control, darkroom and processing equipment, film / screen structure and function, artifacts, sensitometry / characteristic curves, and quality control. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139, 211, 212, 213, 214, 219. Parallel: RAD 222, 223, 224, 229. Open only to radiography students.

 

Radiation Protection and Radiobiology – RAD 222 (34 lecture hours, 2.0 credits)

This course identifies the human response to ionizing radiation and identifies tissues that are more sensitive than others in radiation. A synopsis of health physics is also introduced to the student identifying specific agencies that govern the radiation exposure to the general public as well as the occupational worker. The application of radiation protection for patients and personnel will be emphasized. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139, 211, 212, 213, 214, 219. Parallel: RAD 221, 223, 224, 229. Open only to radiography students.

 

Radiographic Image Analysis – RAD 223 (17 lecture hours, 1.0 credit)

This course is designed to assess each student’s ability to critique radiographic images for proper patient positioning, exposure factors, anatomy, artifacts and evidence of radiation protection. Critical thinking and problem solving skills are necessary in determining causes of technical problems and identifying corrective actions. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139, 211, 212, 213, 214, 219. Parallel: RAD 221, 222, 224, 229. Open only to radiography students.

 

Registry Review – RAD 224 (4 lecture hours, 48 lab hours, 1.5 credits)

This course is a review session to help prepare the students for the national ARRT registry examination.  A brief overview of the subjects studied during the course of the program will be addressed.  The course also incorporates the use of mock board exams to help aid students in the review process and to chart progress toward ARRT board readiness. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139, 211, 212, 213, 214, 219. Parallel: RAD 221, 222, 223, 229. Open only to radiography students.

 

Clinical Education V – RAD 229 (432 clinical hours, 9.5 credit hours)

This course is a continuation of Clinical Education IV as students continue to rotate through various aspects of the radiology department with the expectation to refine clinical skills through clinical participation under direct and indirect supervision of procedures taught in Radiographic Positioning I and II and to continue the advancement basic patient care skills. Supplemental outside rotations at secondary clinical education sites within the St. Vincent Health system and primary care/ambulatory clinics to promote a wider range of experiences with equipment, protocols, and patient care may be utilized. Students will continue pediatric rotations and continue evening assignments as an introduction to radiography services performed after normal working hours. Students will continue dedicated CT rotations to foster clinical competency in required CT exams. Students will also continue rotations through medical imaging modalities of MRI, angiography, sonography, radiation oncology, and nuclear medicine to further their understanding of medical imaging. Students will be assigned clinically to approximately 24 contact hours / week. Students must complete all required competencies as defined in syllabus and the Clinical Competency Policy. Prerequisites: RAD 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 119, 121, 122, 123, 129, 131, 139, 211, 212, 213, 214, 219. Parallel: RAD 221, 222, 223, 224. Open only to radiography students.